The camping trip is attended by approximately 80 to 140 people depending on campsite. It is a community building activity were attendees of both services and their families can take time to get to know each other away from the church. For many attendees it is a family church tradition.

The event covers 3 nights and 4 days on average. Family friendly activities take place every day and there is a huge pot luck that is often also attended by people who drive up just for the day (another 10 people or so). This summer we will be camping at Pine Valley North Group Site C located up Mirror Lake Highway. The site holds 140 people (number of vehicles 25).  Cost is $30 per car.

Arrival Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 Check-in Time: 2:00 PM  Departure Date: Mon Jul 24 2017 Check-out Time: 1:00 PM

Overview: Pine Valley North Wasatch Cache Group Campground is located on the beautiful Mirror Lake Scenic Byway in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah. The Uintas are known for their abundant recreational opportunities and scenic beauty.

Natural Features: The campground is situated among shady pines and aspens at an elevation of 7,400 feet. The dense stands of trees provide nice shade.

Recreation: The Lower Provo River is nearby, offering good trout fishing. Numerous hiking, biking and horseback riding trails crisscross this beautiful mountain area, including North Fork and Shingle Creek Trails. Off-road vehicle trails are in the vicinity.

Facilities: The campground contains three group sites with picnic and serving tables, grills, campfire circles and large paved parking areas. Vault toilets, and trash collection are provided. We are in Site C. Nearby Attractions: Mirror Lake Scenic Byway parallels the Lower Provo River as it snakes across a portion of the Uinta Mountains, leading to numerous high alpine lakes and streams, countless trails, breathtaking scenic viewpoints. Fishing, canoeing, hiking, backpacking, horseback riding and biking are popular activities. The High Uintas Wilderness can be accessed from several trails along the byway.

There is limited parking, so please sign up  early by filling out the form and pay fee at by clicking here.  

On Being White ...

-Submitted by Joan M. Gregory, Member, Anti-Racism Committee (ARC)

So many of us in our congregation are white.  We’ve been white for our entire lives.  Obvious?  Maybe ... maybe not.  Being white is something we cannot escape, being white is something we cannot change.  In America, being white comes with privilege.   Privilege that we take for granted, privilege we take advantage of every living moment of our lives.  Privilege we are taught NEVER to see.  But privilege is something we can and must change, privilege is something we can learn to see, and then learn how to speak up and show up and stand up when white privilege and white supremacy take action to trample and endanger people of color.

Some of us have dark skin and we’ve had dark skin for our entire lives.  Being dark skinned, being black, being people of color, is something we cannot escape, something we cannot change.   In America, being dark skinned, being black, being people of color, is dangerous every living moment of our lives.   From the day we are born our community teaches us that we must be vigilant every second.  We must practice this vigilance daily, we must teach it to our children.  It is the air we breathe.

And when we speak up for our rights or the rights of our children or friends or colleagues, we, people of color, are taking huge risks.  We are not bringing race into unrelated contexts or playing the race card.  We are living and breathing the impacts of racial injustice ... all ... the ... time.  There isn’t a moment of rest.  It is the context we live in.

What does racial injustice look like in SLC?   Rebecca Hall, JD, PhD, an African American woman, was fired on April 6, 2017 via a text message from her position as Center Coordinator of South Salt Lake’s Promise after school program located at Cottonwood High School.  Read - http://tinyurl.com/FiringOfRebeccaHall  - about the impact of her firing not only on her, but on the immigrant families whom she was serving.  How would you respond?  Would you ask: What may I do to help?

What does white privilege look like?   How will we respond?   Want to understand more?  Want to get involved?  Join the Anti-Racism Committee of First Unitarian Church at our June meeting on Monday, June 19th, 6:30-8:30PM, in Room 207, RE Building.   To be added to our email list, send an email to: .  We are considering doing another round of reading Debby Irving’s Waking Up White and Finding Myself in the Story of Race.   Would you like to participate in the reading and discussion?  Send an email to: to let us know.

We are also working with others in the Salt Lake community, in particular, SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice).   SURJ meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7PM at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 261 S 900 E.  Check out their Facebook page closer to the meeting date to verify date and time: https://www.facebook.com/surjslc/

Learn more at the SURJ meeting, the ARC meeting, or stop by the Environmental Ministry table on Sunday.  Why the Environmental Ministry table – because all things are connected - Dr. Hall is also an active member of the environmental and climate justice community.

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION:

FROM THE ASHES

Friday, June 23rd, 7-9PM in Eliot Hall

From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be under the Trump Administration.  From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. From the Ashes invites audiences to learn more about an industry on the edge and what it means for their lives. Learn more: https://www.fromtheashesfilm.com/

From the Ashes was produced by RadicalMedia in partnership with Bloomberg Philanthropies.   This screening has been made possible by the Interfaith Power & Light network of which Utah Interfaith Power & Light is a part.  This is a great opportunity see this film in advance of the National Geographic global broadcast premiere on June 25th.

Co-Sponsors: Association for the Tree of Life, Climate Emergency Coalition, and Environmental Ministry – First Unitarian Church of SLC.

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION:

FROM THE ASHES

Friday, June 23rd, 7-9PM in Eliot Hall

From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be under the Trump Administration.  From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. From the Ashes invites audiences to learn more about an industry on the edge and what it means for their lives. Learn more: https://www.fromtheashesfilm.com/

From the Ashes was produced by RadicalMedia in partnership with Bloomberg Philanthropies.   This screening has been made possible by the Interfaith Power & Light network of which Utah Interfaith Power & Light is a part.  This is a great opportunity see this film in advance of the National Geographic global broadcast premiere on June 25th.

Co-Sponsors: Association for the Tree of Life, Climate Emergency Coalition, and Environmental Ministry – First Unitarian Church of SLC.

The camping trip is attended by approximately 80 to 140 people depending on campsite. It is a community building activity were attendees of both services and their families can take time to get to know each other away from the church. For many attendees it is a family church tradition.

The event covers 3 nights and 4 days on average. Family friendly activities take place every day and there is a huge pot luck that is often also attended by people who drive up just for the day (another 10 people or so). This summer we will be camping at Pine Valley North Group Site C located up Mirror Lake Highway. The site holds 140 people (number of vehicles 25).  Cost is $30 per car.

Arrival Date: Fri Jul 21 2017 Check-in Time: 2:00 PM  Departure Date: Mon Jul 24 2017 Check-out Time: 1:00 PM

Overview: Pine Valley North Wasatch Cache Group Campground is located on the beautiful Mirror Lake Scenic Byway in the Uinta Mountains of northeastern Utah. The Uintas are known for their abundant recreational opportunities and scenic beauty.

Natural Features: The campground is situated among shady pines and aspens at an elevation of 7,400 feet. The dense stands of trees provide nice shade.

Recreation: The Lower Provo River is nearby, offering good trout fishing. Numerous hiking, biking and horseback riding trails crisscross this beautiful mountain area, including North Fork and Shingle Creek Trails. Off-road vehicle trails are in the vicinity.

Facilities: The campground contains three group sites with picnic and serving tables, grills, campfire circles and large paved parking areas. Vault toilets, and trash collection are provided. We are in Site C. Nearby Attractions: Mirror Lake Scenic Byway parallels the Lower Provo River as it snakes across a portion of the Uinta Mountains, leading to numerous high alpine lakes and streams, countless trails, breathtaking scenic viewpoints. Fishing, canoeing, hiking, backpacking, horseback riding and biking are popular activities. The High Uintas Wilderness can be accessed from several trails along the byway.

There is limited parking, so please sign up  early by filling out the form and pay fee at by clicking here.  

Congregational Announcements

Congregational Survey.  Your Board of Trustees will be distributing our Annual Congregational Survey this week.  Please watch for an email with a link to the survey.  You can also find the survey on our church website.  We will have a few paper forms available at the Congregational Life table.  This is a 10-minute task that provides critical information for the Board and church staff.  Please let us know how we are doing by completing the survey before June 1.  Survey results will be shared with the congregation in September.

Refugee Resettlement Committee Sweep the dust off your porch, wipe the frost off your windows and critically scan inside your house for vibrant living and dining furniture, table lamps, wall art, etc. Spot what you can do without, and can share with families of tired, bright faces new to the Salt Lake Valley arriving in need our help. Seize the item and call Joe DuBray (904-527-9773) or email () and someone from the RRC will pick it up, promptly, to welcome and brighten the Spring of a refugee family.

Social Justice Film June 1st The congregation, and all members of the community are invited to a free film, 'Oriented,'  7 pm, June 1 in Eliot Hall.  This film will be of special interest to LBGTQs, and all minorities.  This cutting edge film is about three gay Palestinian friends,  who leave families and religion, and move to Tel Aviv where they will explore their sexuality, religious beliefs and cultural norms.  Sponsored by the Tanner Center for Human Rights, Unitarian Social Justice Council and Utahns for a Just Peace in the Holy Land. Film not suitable for children. Adult language, adult themes.

UU Lunch Bunch A family-friendly group for anyone and everyone who would like to get together for lunch and chat with like-minded people. Meet at the Restaurant on Sundays following coffee hour. For more information contact Sonia Carnell at (801) 262-1151 or

  • May 28th: Flatbread Naepolitian Pizzeria (2121 S. McClelland, Ste. E)
  • June 4th: Desert Edge Brewery (Trolley Square)
  • June 11th: Church Picnic at Sugarhouse Park
  • June 18th: Avenues Proper (376 8th Avenue)
  • June 25th: Oasis Cafe (151 South 500 East)

FILM SCREENING & DISCUSSION:

FROM THE ASHES

Friday, June 23rd, 7-9PM in Eliot Hall

From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be under the Trump Administration.  From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. From the Ashes invites audiences to learn more about an industry on the edge and what it means for their lives. Learn more: https://www.fromtheashesfilm.com/

From the Ashes was produced by RadicalMedia in partnership with Bloomberg Philanthropies.   This screening has been made possible by the Interfaith Power & Light network of which Utah Interfaith Power & Light is a part.  This is a great opportunity see this film in advance of the National Geographic global broadcast premiere on June 25th.

Co-Sponsors: Association for the Tree of Life, Climate Emergency Coalition, and Environmental Ministry – First Unitarian Church of SLC.

On Being White ...

-Submitted by Joan M. Gregory, Member, Anti-Racism Committee (ARC)

So many of us in our congregation are white.  We’ve been white for our entire lives.  Obvious?  Maybe ... maybe not.  Being white is something we cannot escape, being white is something we cannot change.  In America, being white comes with privilege.   Privilege that we take for granted, privilege we take advantage of every living moment of our lives.  Privilege we are taught NEVER to see.  But privilege is something we can and must change, privilege is something we can learn to see, and then learn how to speak up and show up and stand up when white privilege and white supremacy take action to trample and endanger people of color.

Some of us have dark skin and we’ve had dark skin for our entire lives.  Being dark skinned, being black, being people of color, is something we cannot escape, something we cannot change.   In America, being dark skinned, being black, being people of color, is dangerous every living moment of our lives.   From the day we are born our community teaches us that we must be vigilant every second.  We must practice this vigilance daily, we must teach it to our children.  It is the air we breathe.

And when we speak up for our rights or the rights of our children or friends or colleagues, we, people of color, are taking huge risks.  We are not bringing race into unrelated contexts or playing the race card.  We are living and breathing the impacts of racial injustice ... all ... the ... time.  There isn’t a moment of rest.  It is the context we live in.

What does racial injustice look like in SLC?   Rebecca Hall, JD, PhD, an African American woman, was fired on April 6, 2017 via a text message from her position as Center Coordinator of South Salt Lake’s Promise after school program located at Cottonwood High School.  Read - http://tinyurl.com/FiringOfRebeccaHall  - about the impact of her firing not only on her, but on the immigrant families whom she was serving.  How would you respond?  Would you ask: What may I do to help?

What does white privilege look like?   How will we respond?   Want to understand more?  Want to get involved?  Join the Anti-Racism Committee of First Unitarian Church at our June meeting on Monday, June 19th, 6:30-8:30PM, in Room 207, RE Building.   To be added to our email list, send an email to: .  We are considering doing another round of reading Debby Irving’s Waking Up White and Finding Myself in the Story of Race.   Would you like to participate in the reading and discussion?  Send an email to: to let us know.

We are also working with others in the Salt Lake community, in particular, SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice).   SURJ meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 7PM at St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 261 S 900 E.  Check out their Facebook page closer to the meeting date to verify date and time: https://www.facebook.com/surjslc/

Learn more at the SURJ meeting, the ARC meeting, or stop by the Environmental Ministry table on Sunday.  Why the Environmental Ministry table – because all things are connected - Dr. Hall is also an active member of the environmental and climate justice community.

-submitted by Joan Gregory, Environmental Ministry

AWAKE, A Dream from Standing Rock

Friday, May 19, 2017, 7-9PM Eliot Hall

Click here for the trailer

AWAKE, A Dream from Standing Rock, released on April 22, 2017, follows the dramatic rise of the historic #NODAPL native-led peaceful resistance at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, which captured the world’s attention as one of the biggest stories of 2016. Thousands of activists converged from around the country to stand in solidarity with the water protectors (activists) standing strong against the construction of the $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), being built to carry fracked oil from North Dakota’s Bakken oil fields through sovereign land and under the Missouri River, the water source for the Standing Rock reservation and 17 million people downstream.

A unique collaborative documentary created in three chapters, each helmed by a different filmmaker, the feature length film is directed by Academy Award nominated filmmaker and activist Josh Fox (Gasland, How To Let Go Of The World And Learn To Love Everything Climate Can’t Change), Academy Award nominated filmmaker James Spione (Silenced, Incident in New Baghdad) and indigenous filmmaker and Digital Smoke Signals founder Myron Dewey.

Each of the three sections of the film tells the story of Standing Rock in the unique perspective and style of the filmmaker who created it. The immersive documentary features emotional first-person accounts as well as gripping verité footage of militarized local police and private security teams confronting water protectors and journalists with rubber bullets, mace, tear gas, water hoses, and weaponized dogs. But the film also takes us behind the front lines to reveal the intimate day-to-day life of the camp community, as indigenous and non-indigenous protectors gather for peaceful prayer and song, and engage in daily tasks like clearing snow, raising tipis, distributing clothing donations, or building sleeping barracks for the many veterans who arrived to join the water protectors.

Standing Rock has awakened the nation and has forever changed the way we will fight for clean water, our environment and the future of our planet.   A discussion will follow the film.

[ photos from various recent environmental events, including Climate March and Bears Ears event can be see on our Facebook page ]

Church Picnic June 11th - First Church Needs Your Help! This year’s picnic is Sunday, June 11, and we have several volunteer opportunities. Help is needed for a supplies and food run (Friday, June 9); hauling tables, chairs, food, etc. to Sugar House Park (Sunday morning), and set-up at the site; grilling hamburgers, veggie burgers, and hotdogs, mixing (soft) drinks, and assistance with cleanup. Religious education has offered to plan activities for our youth.  Volunteers to coordinate other youth or adult activities will be warmly welcomed. Contact Joe Herring at , or 801-440-5521.

Refugee Resettlement Committee Sweep the dust off your porch, wipe the frost off your windows and critically scan inside your house for vibrant living and dining furniture, table lamps, wall art, etc. Spot what you can do without, and can share with families of tired, bright faces new to the Salt Lake Valley arriving in need our help. Seize the item and call Joe DuBray (904-527-9773) or email () and someone from the RRC will pick it up, promptly, to welcome and brighten the Spring of a refugee family.

Social Justice film Have we got a film for you. If you are gay, lesbian, Moslem, atheist, minority of any kind; if you have bee afraid to “come out” to your parents, if you have left the denomination of your family, if you have lived in a city where you didn’t fit in; we have a film for you. This is the story of 3 gay Palestinians who move to Tel Aviv to explore their sexual identity. “Oriented” will be shown Thursday, June 1, 7:00 pm, Eliot Hall. Sponsored by Tanner Center for Human Rights, Unitarian Social Justice Committee and Utahns for a Just Peace in the Holy Land. Free. Panel discussion following 80 minute film. As Unitarians we try to build and more just and inclusive world.

Dinner and Dialogue  Due to the amazing and generous support of so many of you, our Dinner and Dialogue events have been going very well.  It seems that we are getting to know each other better!  Please feel free to host a dinner (or lunch or brunch if you wish) on a date and time of your choosing in your home, or sign up to attend one.  We have newcomers and old-timers alike participating, so be sure to look over the white binder at the Congregational Life Table in Eliot Hall to see what might interest you.   You can contact Darlene Thayne at suppers @slcuu.org or 801-455-6553 if you need any assistance on this.  Let's get acquainted!

Mindfulness Group Every Sunday, meditation is offered as a time to pause, practice calming our thoughts and setting an intention to be mindful in our daily life.  Guidance for developing meditation practice is shared along with suggested websites and reading. The community supports our intention to experience the benefits of being mindfully aware so that we may cultivate and live with calm, peace and ease.  All are welcome. Sundays Following the end of the first service, in the Parlor.

UU Lunch Bunch A family-friendly group for anyone and everyone who would like to get together for lunch and chat with like-minded people. Meet at the Restaurant on Sundays at 1 pm. For more information contact Sonia Carnell at (801) 262-1151 or

  • May 14: Provisions (3364 South 2300 East)
  • May 21st: Congregational Meeting - no lunch bunch today
  • May 28th: Flatbread Naepolitian Pizzeria (2121 S. McClelland, Ste. E)